workshops for businesses

A great team’s evolution is never complete

The most successful teams see professional development as more than a morale boost, but rather a crucial strategy for engagement, productivity, efficiency and well-being, which in turn improves the bottom line.

professional development
Group 2007 (1)

Teams that learn together, perform together

It’s an investment with a ripple effect.

The businesses that set themselves apart prioritize team development. WYLD workshops are designed to expand not only the individual, but to lift up the collective as well.

Why invest in professional development?

In a time of "quiet quitting," it is essential to your business's performance and cultural well-being to commit the time and budget to addressing the unique opportunities, pressures, and needs of your employees.

Retaining talent seems harder and harder no matter what industry your organization is in. Different talent profiles, cultural backgrounds, age groups, levels of leadership, etc. have varying drivers of engagement. What does meaningful employee recognition and team collaboration look like? Team development and management training can go a long way.

Do you know what your workforce needs to feel valued and motivated in order to contribute excellence? Work with us to identify what your workforce needs to feel valued and motivated in order to contribute excellence.

Voluntary turnover costs U.S. businesses $1 trillion

"The cost of replacing an individual employee can range from one-half to two times the employee's annual salary — and that's a conservative estimate."

Our experiential learning approach

No matter the topic, we design experiences that are engaging, fun, memorable, and results-driven. Even our more “left brain” oriented development tools are explored by using the five senses.

We strive to provide support that not only addresses your immediate needs, but offers a welcome opportunity to step into a bigger picture thinking mentality with renewed energy.

Strengths Workshop
Peak Performance Workshop
Feedback Principles Workshop

1/2-1 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to enhance individual and team talent dynamics for improved performance, collaboration, engagement, and well-being

Share key statistics, background, and impact of CliftonStrengths

Warm-up: Strengths scavenger hunt / nature walk to facilitate deeper understanding and ownership of each leader’s talents and to get the participants moving to maximize their engagement

Strengths framework of “Name, claim, tame, aim” introduction — sample activities that would coincide with this framework are:

  • Name: Each leader to share their strengths artifacts (nature objects) and create their own strengths flashcards to refer back to post workshop
  • Claim: Partner speed chats to articulate what each talent contributes to and needs from the team
  • Tame: Strengths “above the line” vs. “below the line” to understand the impact of your talent in times of stress and pressure vs. moments of creativity and collaboration; create strategies for self-regulation and resilience at work
  • Aim: Strategic application to self and team development opportunities to foster sustainable change and promote effective team collaboration

1/2-1 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to normalize stress science principles impacting all leaders and develop action plans to improve individual resilience and increase the group’s time spent in peak performance

Share the most cutting edge stress science and how it relates to workplace dynamics.

Collaborative discussion: Participants develop a deeper understanding of the importance of both negative and positive emotions and key factors regarding the way our brains are wired. It’s not about eliminating stress, it’s about learning to use it to our advantage.

Musical tour of the brain to make this data-driven information more memorable. Leaders stand in silence allowing the music to take over their senses in order to embody these scientific principles and personalize their application.

  • “Below the line” music: Two songs to evoke either the “fight or flight” or “freeze” response. Leaders record what people, places, and circumstances put them here.
  • “Above the line” music: Two songs to evoke two different thriving responses - logical, sequential productivity or creative, emotional expression. Leaders identify existing and develop new recovery techniques to place them in peak performance territory.
  • Accountability partner chat: Share the situations at work that do / do not set them up for success and how best to support their recovery if sent “below the line.”
  • Collective discussion: Strategize action steps to support the collective in staying in a thriving state more consistently.

1/2 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to provide managers with concrete strategies to improve the way they deliver and receive feedback

Share the data on the importance of receiving regular recognition and progress reports.

Collaborative discussion: Participants talk through the key principles of giving and receiving great feedback.

Rotating partner chats:

  • Share a story about the best recognition you ever received. What does this reveal about your values and how you like to be praised? How might this inform how you go about celebrating the big and small wins of others moving forward?
  • Reflect on the worst feedback you ever received and relate it to what does and doesn’t set you up to actually hear and absorb constructive commentary. How might this alter your approach to giving constructive feedback?
  • Talk through a moment in your career where you could have delivered feedback more effectively. With your partner, come up with 1-3 things you would do differently as a result of today’s learning.

Case study: Leaders select 1 direct report to practice their new feedback approach. In pairs or small groups, each manager will guide a mock 1-on-1 that includes a tailored message to help their direct report prepare for the discussion and meaningful employee recognition + constructive feedback communicated in a way that reflects the employee’s personal preferences.

Wrap up and next steps discussion.

Strengths Workshop

1/2-1 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to enhance individual and team talent dynamics for improved performance, collaboration, engagement, and well-being

Share key statistics, background, and impact of CliftonStrengths

Warm-up: Strengths scavenger hunt / nature walk to facilitate deeper understanding and ownership of each leader’s talents and to get the participants moving to maximize their engagement

Strengths framework of “Name, claim, tame, aim” introduction — sample activities that would coincide with this framework are:

  • Name: Each leader to share their strengths artifacts (nature objects) and create their own strengths flashcards to refer back to post workshop
  • Claim: Partner speed chats to articulate what each talent contributes to and needs from the team
  • Tame: Strengths “above the line” vs. “below the line” to understand the impact of your talent in times of stress and pressure vs. moments of creativity and collaboration; create strategies for self-regulation and resilience at work
  • Aim: Strategic application to self and team development opportunities to foster sustainable change and promote effective team collaboration
Peak Performance Workshop

1/2-1 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to normalize stress science principles impacting all leaders and develop action plans to improve individual resilience and increase the group’s time spent in peak performance

Share the most cutting edge stress science and how it relates to workplace dynamics.

Collaborative discussion: Participants develop a deeper understanding of the importance of both negative and positive emotions and key factors regarding the way our brains are wired. It’s not about eliminating stress, it’s about learning to use it to our advantage.

Musical tour of the brain to make this data-driven information more memorable. Leaders stand in silence allowing the music to take over their senses in order to embody these scientific principles and personalize their application.

  • “Below the line” music: Two songs to evoke either the “fight or flight” or “freeze” response. Leaders record what people, places, and circumstances put them here.
  • “Above the line” music: Two songs to evoke two different thriving responses - logical, sequential productivity or creative, emotional expression. Leaders identify existing and develop new recovery techniques to place them in peak performance territory.
  • Accountability partner chat: Share the situations at work that do / do not set them up for success and how best to support their recovery if sent “below the line.”
  • Collective discussion: Strategize action steps to support the collective in staying in a thriving state more consistently.
Feedback Principles Workshop

1/2 Day Sample Agenda

Objective: to provide managers with concrete strategies to improve the way they deliver and receive feedback

Share the data on the importance of receiving regular recognition and progress reports.

Collaborative discussion: Participants talk through the key principles of giving and receiving great feedback.

Rotating partner chats:

  • Share a story about the best recognition you ever received. What does this reveal about your values and how you like to be praised? How might this inform how you go about celebrating the big and small wins of others moving forward?
  • Reflect on the worst feedback you ever received and relate it to what does and doesn’t set you up to actually hear and absorb constructive commentary. How might this alter your approach to giving constructive feedback?
  • Talk through a moment in your career where you could have delivered feedback more effectively. With your partner, come up with 1-3 things you would do differently as a result of today’s learning.

Case study: Leaders select 1 direct report to practice their new feedback approach. In pairs or small groups, each manager will guide a mock 1-on-1 that includes a tailored message to help their direct report prepare for the discussion and meaningful employee recognition + constructive feedback communicated in a way that reflects the employee’s personal preferences.

Wrap up and next steps discussion.

Additional workshop topics

1

Leadership principles

An overview of Gallup’s research on the four basic needs of followers — Hope, Stability, Trust, Compassion — tied to Strengths. Each leader would explore how they could uniquely deliver on these 4 needs based on their talent profile.

2

Feedback and performance reviews

An overview of the principles of giving and receiving feedback focusing on both the power of recognition and as well as on constructive commentary. Leaders will prepare to guide performance reviews by weaving in the learning from all previous topics.

3

Diversity, inclusion and belonging

A safe space for meaningful discussion and clear action around welcoming, giving voice to, and offering a sense of belonging for diverse perspectives.

4

Boss-to-coach management training

A Strengths-based approach to evolving your management style in order to best personalize your approach to each direct report and empower their success. Participants will leave with a clear implementation strategy based on their talent profile.

5

Q12 drivers of employee engagement

An overview of Gallup’s ongoing research on the most predictive drivers of employee engagement to be used as a diagnostic tool for leaders to pinpoint where their organization is thriving vs. most challenged in giving employees what they need to succeed.

6

The five dysfunctions of a team

What gets in the way of a team’s success? Based on the book of the same title, we will outline the five key barriers to groups operating with a high sense of trust, commitment, alignment, and accountability and what to do when these barriers arise.

7

Complementary partnerships

Further building on each leader’s Strengths awareness, we will focus on the three main types of complementary partnerships: to make up for a less dominant talent, to pick up where one person leaves off, to enhance what one person already possesses.

8

Stages of team development

Identifying the typical “seasons” of team development, this workshop is designed to normalize the growing pains and potential of bringing people together around a common mission. Leaders will work on a tailored approach based on where their team is.

9

Archetypes of an entrepreneur

Leaning on science and pattern recognition from our work with entrepreneurs, we will normalize the typical reality of an entrepreneur and the unique wiring of visionary leaders.

10

Designing your work week

Incorporating data on optimal work flow and circadian / ultradian rhythms, this will be a tactical session for participants to design their ideal work week and create an accountability plan for how to execute and stick to it.

11

Designing your company culture

Guided by Dan Coyle’s book The Culture Code, we will explore what a thriving culture looks like and the three key ways to build a team that is greater than the sum of its parts.

The benefits of workshops and sample engagements

The benefits of workshops and sample engagements

According to Gallup research, companies with highly engaged workforces outperform their peers by 147% earnings per share. Every WYLD workshop is designed around the objective of increasing your team's engagement.

Some Reasons to Invest in a Workshop:
icon-bullet-point

A need to support recently promoted employees with gaps in foundational leadership and management skills

icon-bullet-point

A desire to understand the unique motivations of your workforce and how to optimize their contributions

icon-bullet-point

An opportunity to retain and attract more diverse voices

icon-bullet-point

A challenge to develop connective tissue within a virtual workforce

icon-bullet-point

A need to level set when employees have entered their tier of leadership at different times

icon-bullet-point

An opportunity to cultivate a common positive language for your team

icon-bullet-point

A desire to provide ongoing development resources for your employees

What Your Engagement Could Look Like

60-90-minute virtual workshop for up to 10 participants

starts at $3,000

3-4 hour virtual workshop for up to 10 participants

starts at $5,500

3-4 hour in-person workshop for up to 10 participants

starts at $8,200

5-6 hour virtual workshop for up to 10 participants

starts at $9,500

5-6 hour in-person workshop for up to 10 participants

starts at $12,000

Adding on executive coaching to any workshop

starts at $200 per 60-minute call

* If the event is for a non-profit organization, please reach out for pricing that best fits your budget

How we customize your workshop

Your individual leadership goals, team dynamics, challenges, and opportunity areas shape your WYLD experience. We take the time to get to know your daily reality so we can design a tailored experience for maximum impact both short and long-term.

No two WYLD experiences are alike. The below is a sample of our approach.

Design

Vector (35)

The Goal

To understand individual and collective development goals from each leader's and stakeholder's perspective

The Process

Align

Vector (36)

The Goal

To center the workshop experience around

The Process

Experience

Vector (37)

The Goal

To deliver an objective-driven team experience that has a company-wide ripple effect

The Process

Debrief

Vector (38)

The Goal

To recap workshop insights, the delta we observed, and advise on a go forward strategy

The Process

higher self-awareness = higher stock performance

An analysis by Korn Ferry of >6000 individuals in >480 publicly traded companies revealed

Mask group (2)
Companies with a higher rate of return also employ professionals who exhibit higher levels of self-awareness
Mask group
Companies with the greater percentage of self-aware employees consistently outperformed the rest (over the thirty months that stocks were tracked)
Mask group (1)
Despite its close association with high performance, self awareness is generally in short supply, but can be developed in leaders

How would your team benefit with professional development?

To improve your business, focus on the individual.

Through a highly-customized approach, the WYLD experience increases individual self-awareness and provides leaders with clear frameworks for success. The more skilled leaders become at leveraging their unique talents and growing their personal leadership styles, the greater the impact on the business as a whole.

Our workshop locations

We come to you! Whenever possible, we recommend offsite locations that offer distance from daily office patterns, so participants can step into blank slate learning. We guide the venue selection process to find the most convenient and inspirational space that fits your budget and timeframe.

Virtual Workshops
Turtle Dove Farm
Glenstone Gardens
Scribner's Catskill Lodge

Virtual workshops

Where: over Zoom

Length of time: This is tailored to your optimal time frame. We conduct virtual workshops from 60 or 90-minutes long to full day events.

Sample Engagement Strategies: We utilize the five senses to make our online learning sessions as multi-dimensional and dynamic as possible.

  • Nature metaphors to step into bigger picture thinking
  • Partner walk and talks to take a break from the screen
  • Creative arts to make the learning tangible
  • Body movement to re-energize participants
  • Journaling to personalize participant insights
  • Music, scent, and physical objects to make the learning "stickier"

Turtle Dove Farm

About the Property: A former winery nestled on 44 acres of rolling hills in Delaplane, VA. The Abbey, TDF’s multi-purpose newly renovated event barn, sits in the heart of the property where gorgeous views induce serenity.

Getting there: 1 hour from Washington D.C., 45-minutes to Dulles Airport and 1 hour to Reagan Airport

Sample activities:

  • Intuitive horse work
  • Creative art collage
  • Floral design
  • Sound bath and reiki
  • Nature walks

Glenstone Gardens

About the Property: A 1,000 acre private country estate tucked under the eastern slope of the Bull Run Mountains in Middleburg, VA. Settled circa 1750 by the same family who owns it today, this property has been placed in a lifetime conservation easement.

Getting there: 1 hour from Washington D.C., 25-minutes to Dulles Airport and 1 hour to Reagan Airport

Sample activities:

  • Horseback riding
  • Sporting clay range
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Air rifle
  • Archery
  • Canoeing
  • Wine tasting

Scribner's Catskill Lodge

About the Property: 20 acres of naturescape nestled in the Catskill Mountains founded in 1966

Getting there: 40 minutes from Amtrak's Hudson Train Station, 2.5 hours from New York City, 1.25 hours from Albany airport

Sample activities:

  • Meeting spaces designed for custom experiences
  • Hiking trails
  • Garden tour
  • Cocktail class
  • Soundbath / meditation
  • Ice skating and skiing in winter
Virtual Workshops
A person writing on a copybook

Virtual workshops

Where: over Zoom

Length of time: This is tailored to your optimal time frame. We conduct virtual workshops from 60 or 90-minutes long to full day events.

Sample Engagement Strategies: We utilize the five senses to make our online learning sessions as multi-dimensional and dynamic as possible.

  • Nature metaphors to step into bigger picture thinking
  • Partner walk and talks to take a break from the screen
  • Creative arts to make the learning tangible
  • Body movement to re-energize participants
  • Journaling to personalize participant insights
  • Music, scent, and physical objects to make the learning "stickier"
Turtle Dove Farm
Turtle Dove Farm

Turtle Dove Farm

About the Property: A former winery nestled on 44 acres of rolling hills in Delaplane, VA. The Abbey, TDF’s multi-purpose newly renovated event barn, sits in the heart of the property where gorgeous views induce serenity.

Getting there: 1 hour from Washington D.C., 45-minutes to Dulles Airport and 1 hour to Reagan Airport

Sample activities:

  • Intuitive horse work
  • Creative art collage
  • Floral design
  • Sound bath and reiki
  • Nature walks
Glenstone Gardens
Glenstone Gardens

Glenstone Gardens

About the Property: A 1,000 acre private country estate tucked under the eastern slope of the Bull Run Mountains in Middleburg, VA. Settled circa 1750 by the same family who owns it today, this property has been placed in a lifetime conservation easement.

Getting there: 1 hour from Washington D.C., 25-minutes to Dulles Airport and 1 hour to Reagan Airport

Sample activities:

  • Horseback riding
  • Sporting clay range
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Air rifle
  • Archery
  • Canoeing
  • Wine tasting
Scribner's Catskill Lodge
Scribner's Catskill Lodge

Scribner's Catskill Lodge

About the Property: 20 acres of naturescape nestled in the Catskill Mountains founded in 1966

Getting there: 40 minutes from Amtrak's Hudson Train Station, 2.5 hours from New York City, 1.25 hours from Albany airport

Sample activities:

  • Meeting spaces designed for custom experiences
  • Hiking trails
  • Garden tour
  • Cocktail class
  • Soundbath / meditation
  • Ice skating and skiing in winter

WYLD did a great job of customizing the content and their approach to the specific needs of our team. They did a lot of legwork to bring in the right context and push the team in the right ways. They created a great space for open dialogue and we all got a lot out of the experience.

WYLD provided a great guided experience focused on improving our work environment to double down on our strengths and solve for our weaknesses as a leadership team.

It felt like we were able to connect and understand each other better. I think that will help us in collaboration and assuming positive intent when we hit disagreements or roadblocks. It felt reenergizing.

With everything going on these days (COVID, remote, etc), it's hard to find time for a leadership team to come together and focus on teambuilding. The WYLD workshop was an engaging (yes, even though it was virtual) and actionable day for our team and I'm excited to see how it impacts our work!

– Workshop participant and coaching client
– Workshop participant
– Workshop participant and coaching client
– Workshop participant
Title (1)

Common questions about our workshops

What types of workshops do you do?

Our topics range from tactical business tools to more conceptual leadership frameworks. Our most popular subjects include talent enhancement (CliftonStrengths), peak performance and energy management (stress science), and the principles of great feedback.

We are always adding new topics and themes to our workshop list and love creating new material that best suits your needs. Reach out to learn more about what we could design for you or your team.

What does a workshop experience actually look like?

No matter if it’s a virtual or in-person event, our workshops are multi-sensorial and designed to be as engaging, fun, and long-lasting as possible so that this isn’t a flash in the pan experience.

What does that mean?

While the component parts of an event are determined based on the topic and your team’s objectives and dynamics, the general story arc of any WYLD workshop includes:

  • The beginning - articulating a clear “WHY” for the workshop (objectives and outcomes) and diving into the key background, data and / or science behind the topic
  • The middle - offering plenty of opportunities for participants to “try on the learning” with solo reflection time, partner chats, embodied exercises (like listening to music to bring the science of stress and optimal performance to life in a more tangible and experiential way that sticks with you), and dialogue with their WYLD facilitators to deepen their understanding of the material
  • The end - closing with a clear “so what” and action and accountability plan that ensures both individuals and the team leave with tangible steps they can take to continue applying what they learned with WYLD to their everyday work reality

What are some examples of ways you increase workshop engagement?

Solo reflection - perhaps by journaling, getting creative or going on a scavenger hunt is meant to:

  • Offer time for processing that is especially helpful to strategic learners who require that quiet space to digest and absorb the materials.
  • Increase the “stickiness” of the subject. We know that pairing visuals (like an icon that represents one of your top Strengths) with words is the best way to ensure learning that lasts. Think of how the alphabet is taught, A is for apple… We also see this as an important way to allow leaders to step out of the weeds of their often block and tackle-like daily reality and into a bigger picture thinking, refreshing, fun, and motivating space.
  • Reset the energy level and focus in the room by giving participants a break from the computer screen or full group learning environment. We look for signs of energy dips like distracted eye contact, slower speech cadence, droopy body language, etc. and pivot quickly to re-engage the group. Simply getting people out of their chairs and moving can increase the likelihood of participants stepping into a broader perspective where they can be more creative, hopeful, resourceful, and collaborative.

Partner chats - tailored to your desired outcomes and synced with the curriculum flow. Examples:

  • A warm up partner conversation may be best with 2 people who don’t know each other well or don’t work together regularly as this is a nice way to get their tails wagging in a lower key forum. We might ask participants to bring an object from home that represents their top talents to share with this partner or
  • An accountability partner chat may come later in the curriculum when participants are comfortable and likely have already embraced vulnerability. This is an opportunity to pair two people together who work together often who may benefit from a fresh perspective on one another, a higher degree of understanding and compassion, and an increased level of trust. The ultimate goal is for them to establish their partner as a supporter ready to initiate action steps to keep them in a place of positive contribution.

What’s the benefit of your workshops?

That largely depends on your objectives and the learning topic, but generally speaking the benefits to a WYLD workshop include an increase in:

  • Self-awareness - leading to a greater ownership of one’s authentic leadership style, unique contributions and needs. When individuals know themselves well, they can teach others more precisely what does and doesn’t set them up for success which is key to effective collaboration.
  • Team cohesion - stemming from a heightened understanding of one another and the collective dynamics as well as a greater compassion for these behavioral drivers, teams lean into their relationships as a result of their time with WYLD. It all starts with our curriculum designed for vulnerability that is the essential ingredient to trust.
  • Collective performance - using data-driven frameworks as their guide, participants develop tactical strategies to be applied immediately following their WYLD event that address their opportunity areas. Whether it’s leveraging CliftonStrengths to create new project management systems that are more aligned with the team’s talent distribution or utilizing their understanding of stress science to optimize the preparation for and execution of a sales pitch, participants leave with an actionable plan.

What is involved in your operational process?

While no two projects look the same, the general arc remains consistent:

  • Discovery - we get to know you and your objectives through conversations with your stakeholders, coaching individual participants, pre-event surveys when applicable, and our own desk research in order to better understand the key factors to customize your curriculum around.
  • Execution - we handle the logistical details leading up to and throughout an event to make it as easy as possible for you to engage with us. We know that what’s happening behind the scenes is just as important as the front-of-room experience when it comes to creating an optimal learning environment for all.
  • Recommendations - we schedule time with your stakeholders to exchange insights on what worked well, what could have been even better, and our suggestions for how best to carry the work forward for lasting results. When post-surveys and coaching are involved, we include that individual feedback into our recap as well.

What is the difference between your in-person and virtual events?

We work hard to bring the same experiential learning to the table no matter the environment. That said, there are a couple of ways we adjust our approach in order to optimize the reality of the space we’re in.

  • Length of time - when virtual, we recommend shorter time frames or breaking up the content into smaller chunks in order to keep the focus and energy up in the room. A 5-6 hour in person workshop might then be two 2.5 hour morning sessions online.
  • Activity mix - when in person, we always look for venues that are as nature-driven and uplifting as possible, so naturally there may be access to activities that would not be available for an online event. However, we incorporate things like nature metaphors, visuals and sounds, creative arts, music, walk and talks ideally outside to take a break for the screen, and scavenger hunts in the home in order to still deliver a multi-sensorial experience.
  • Participant interaction - in person events provide more organic connection opportunities. That’s a big reason why we recommend longer time-frames for these types of events so participants feel they have enough space for deeper discussion.
    In a virtual setting, one significant benefit is that partner discussions can be more efficient without losing the richness. One reason is that facilitators don’t have to spend time wrangling people back from their partner break outs. To maximize connectivity, we use our time wisely and offer as many touch points as possible so the group leaves having interacted with a significant number of coworkers (if not everyone at one point during the event).

Do you recommend virtual or in-person for your workshops?

We believe in the power of intentional learning so we don’t put a lot of weight on where that learning takes place. We know that your budget is a significant factor here and we are happy to help you stretch those dollars as effectively as possible.

A couple of considerations:

  • If one of your challenges is that your team members don’t seem to understand one another very well and may not have ever met in person, an in-person event may really be worth the investment.
  • If you are designing programming for a team that extends over a period of time, we recommend kicking off that program with an in-person event. It’s a powerful way to establish a strong foundation to build off of with future virtual engagements.

What is the cost of coaching as an add on to a workshop experience?

Coaching attached to a workshop = $200 per 60-minute 1-on-1 session with a WYLD facilitator.

Our best practice for workshops is always to include coaching whenever feasible for your timing and budget, so we try to make the price point as accessible as we can in order to make this add on a reality.

Why is this our best practice?

Pre-event coaching gives every leader the space to digest the data related to the workshop topic in advance (ex. their CliftonStrengths profile), learn more about the impact of the given tool, and get to know WYLD. The result? Leaders arrive knowing they are in experienced hands and prepared to dive right into the workshop to get the most out of their time with us.

Post-event coaching locks in the learning once leader’s have had a chance to absorb the workshop materials. This call is focused around creating individual and collective accountability in order to enhance the tool’s staying power. No flash in the pan experiences here!